Dawdling

Walking the trails and road in the wildlife refuge during the summer can be challenging due to heat, high humidity and a large number of mosquitoes which live there.   It’s always nice when the weather cools down and the mosquitoes hibernate or die.  Then, it is possible to walk at a slower pace and take the time to enjoy the sights.

“So you see, imagination needs moodling – long, inefficient, happy idling, dawdling and puttering.”  ~Brenda Ueland 

Rainbow Surprise

On a cloudy day, the still water which stands along the road of the Grassy Island Wildlife Refuge looks dull and covered with a thin coating of scum.

But when the sun shines through the trees at just the right angle, the water magically lights up with beautiful rainbow colors.

According to the West Tennessee National Refuge Complex website, “This rainbow effect on the water is caused by the release of natural oils in decaying vegetation (and particularly from the bald cypress seed pod when it falls from the tree), which produces a thin film over the top of the water”.

This fleeting transformation is just another of nature’s many amazing surprises.

“Never forget to stop to appreciate life’s unexpected awesome moments.”  ~Unknown

An Afternoon Drive

An afternoon drive to Hop-In Refuge allowed us to view Sandhill Cranes which are wintering in West Tennessee.
Then, driving along the back roads in the area, we spotted a Northern Harrier flying low over a farm field in search of small prey …
… and a Great Blue Heron, which seemed out of place standing in a field of long white turnips or radishes.
We found more Sandhill Cranes out foraging in the vegetable fields …
… and blasting out their bugle calls from overhead.
Dried Queen Anne’s Lace heads decorated the roadside ditches, reminiscent of summer days gone by.
“I hope that the days come easy and the moments pass slow, and each road leads you where you want to go.”  ~Rascal Flatts

Hermit Thrush

While hiking a trail in the Reelfoot Wildlife Refuge, this Hermit Thrush caught my attention when it landed on the branch of a nearby tree.  A winter visitor to our state, it spends a lot of its time foraging for insects under fallen leaves or searching for wild berries among the forest’s undergrowth.

“The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.”  ~Leo Tolstoy