Insects on Bur Marigold

Bur marigold attracts many insects which enjoy the nectar and pollen from their flowers.  The beautiful yellow flower heads can be seen in September and October growing in sunny or partially shady wet areas.

“For observing nature, the best pace is a snail’s pace.” ~Edwin Way Teale

Hovering around the flowers

Hummingbirds are attracted to the bright red color of the cardinal flower.  From these delicate, trumpet-shaped flowers, the hummingbird receives sweet nectar.  In return, the cardinal flower depends on the hummingbird for pollination.

Across the downs a hummingbird
Came dipping through the bowers,
He pivoted on emptiness
To scrutinize the flowers.
~Nathalia Crane

Viceroy

We saw these viceroy butterflies flitting about in a garden close to the lake.  Similar to the monarch in appearance, one way to distinguish the viceroy from the monarch is by the visible black line that runs across its hind wings.

“Butterflies … flowers that fly and all but sing.”  ~Robert Frost

Iris time

Around the first week of May, many gardens in Tennessee come alive with showy flowers having a variety of colors and intricate details.  The greatly anticipated iris season only lasts a few weeks.  Though the life of the blooms are short-lived, the beauty and smell of the flowers linger in the mind until the next iris season rolls around.

On the first weekend in May, a town near us hosts an Iris Festival flower show.  This year, as always, we saw a number of beautiful varieties.

“There’s a picture there that lives in memory when it’s Iris time in Tennessee”  ~Willa Waid Newman

Trumpet Daffodils

One day earlier this week the sun was shining, the temperature was mild, and it was a perfect occasion for an afternoon stroll.  I spotted a number of wild daffodils in bloom along our country road.  Nothing brightens the disposition like seeing their little yellow heads bobbing in the wind.

“No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn.”  ~Hal Borland