Dusty

Fall soybean harvest is in full swing, as evidenced by the dust clouds that can be seen throughout West Tennessee.  Farm families call it “money”.  Others might call it “the reason it does no good to wash your car in the autumn” and “the reason the throat feels tight and allergies have kicked up”.  Once the soybeans dry out, a combine comes along, cutting and pushing the plants into the combine and collecting the seeds.  It then discards the chaff out the back. The whole process results in a boat-load of dust and debris being kicked up into the air where it can be seen for miles around.  And, as Isaac Newton said, “What goes up must come down”.  Fortunately, “This, too, shall pass”.  Soon, harvest time will be over, the dust will settle, and once again life in the country will return to normal.

“Dust is a protective coating for fine furniture.”  ~Mario Burata

At work

A demonstration at a local Fall Folklore Jamboree showing traditional farming skills during the 19th and early 20th centuries using mules and horses.

Mules plowing a field.

Horses pulling a log.

“Some people dream of success … while others wake up and work hard at it.”  ~Unknown

Wild Daffodils

 

No flower means spring to me more than the daffodil.  I look forward to the time of year when the wild daffodils spring up in the fields and along the roadside.  Oftentimes, they mark the spot where a house once stood but is now long gone.  Over the years, the bulbs reproduce and leave bright yellow clusters for all to enjoy.

… When all at once I saw a crowd
A host of golden daffodils
Beside the lake beneath the trees
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze …”
― William Wordsworth