Dusty

Fall soybean harvest is in full swing, as evidenced by the dust clouds that can be seen throughout West Tennessee.  Farm families call it “money”.  Others might call it “the reason it does no good to wash your car in the autumn” and “the reason the throat feels tight and allergies have kicked up”.  Once the soybeans dry out, a combine comes along, cutting and pushing the plants into the combine and collecting the seeds.  It then discards the chaff out the back. The whole process results in a boat-load of dust and debris being kicked up into the air where it can be seen for miles around.  And, as Isaac Newton said, “What goes up must come down”.  Fortunately, “This, too, shall pass”.  Soon, harvest time will be over, the dust will settle, and once again life in the country will return to normal.

“Dust is a protective coating for fine furniture.”  ~Mario Burata

Attracted to the Mistflowers

As you drive along the country roads of West Tennessee in the late summer and autumn, you are likely to see a burst of pale bluish-purple wildflowers growing along the way.  The Mistflower grows in clusters, and its fluffy-looking flowers are magnets for butterflies, moths and other insects which are attracted to its nectar.

“There are many things in life that will catch you eye, but only a few will catch your heart.  Pursue these.”  ~Michael Nolan

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

“While it may seem small, the ripple effects of small things is extraordinary.”  Matt Bevin

Busy pollinators

Presently, the fragrant flowers of the White Snakeroot plant can be seen along the edges of the road, especially flourishing in the filtered sunlight of the tall oak trees.  Being one of the last wildflowers to bloom in the autumn, it provides a valuable source of nectar for a variety of busy insects.

“It’s not so much how busy you are, but why you are busy.  The bee is praised.  The mosquito is swatted.”  ~Mary Flannery O’Connor