Migrating Monarchs

So glad to see the Monarch butterflies back in our area after making their spring migration.  They arrived here around the middle to end of April.  These photos were taken on April 28.

“But even if I’m left high and dry at the end of this wild journey, just taking it is a great feeling.”  ~Olivia Wilde

A sea of yellow

Bright-yellow Bulbous Buttercups are in full bloom in the fields and along the roadsides of West Tennessee.  These non-native plants are considered wildflowers by some — and invasive and noxious weeds by others.  Although they add beauty to the landscape, they also  compete with native plant species and are mildly toxic to livestock.

“I’ve learned … that two people can look at the exact same thing and see something totally different.”  ~Unknown

Sandpipers

While driving along the Mississippi levee, in the distance I spotted a small flock of birds that were flying in a formation that looked like a light brown cloud.  They were not ones that I normally see in the area, so I wondered what they were.  Later, as we were driving along a road next to a flooded farm field, we spotted this little flock of birds, which explained what I had seen earlier.  I believe these are Pectoral Sandpipers.  They are common spring migrants in Tennessee from early March to mid-May.

“Live your life as an exclamation rather than an explanation.”  ~Isaac Newton

Along the walking trail

One afternoon this week we enjoyed a pleasant stroll along a greenway near our home.  Part of this trail goes through land upon which a railroad right-of-way once ran, including an old railroad bridge.  Here are a few shots of the rural scenery that were taken along the way.

“Somewhere between the start of the trail and the end is the mystery why we choose to walk.”  ~Unknown