Common buckeye

There were a number of buckeye butterflies fluttering about the tall grass that was growing along the Mississippi levee.  Occasionally they would alight for a short rest (and a photo) before continuing on their way.

“If you get tired, learn to rest, not to quit.”  ~Unknown

A deer in the soybeans

This deer was grazing in a soybean field near Big Sandy Unit Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge.  She raised her head to watch as we drove by.

“Nature has been for me, for as long as I remember, a source of solace, inspiration, adventure, and delight; a home, a teacher, a companion.”  ~Lorraine Anderson

Wildflowers

Here are a variety of wildflowers which pepper the fields and country roads in our area during the spring and summer months.  Wildflowers not only brighten the landscape, but also provide habitat for birds and insects and food for many animals.

“Flowers are the music of the ground
From earth’s lips spoken without sound.”
~Edwin Curran

Wearing camouflage

“Depth must be hidden.  Where?  On the surface.”  ~Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Floating along

An Eastern Amberwing dragonfly floating along atop a dried leaf at Reelfoot Lake.

“Sometimes opportunities float right past your nose.  Work hard, apply yourself, and be ready.  When an opportunity comes you can grab it.”  ~Julie Andrews

Long-horned Bees on black-eyed Susan

On my country road walks in the evenings, I have been seeing these little insects nestled together in the black-eyed Susans.  They are male long-horned bees.  The males have unusually long antenna or “horns” compared to the females, and they sometimes cluster together inside flowers while they sleep.  They are invaluable pollinators of many crops and plants.

“Great works are performed, not by strength, but by perseverance.”  ~Samuel Johnson

Predator or prey?

On one of our recent drives along the Mississippi levee, we came upon what appeared at first to be a tranquil scene.  A colony of great egrets, intermixed with a few graceful geese and a great blue heron, was foraging in the shallow water of a flooded farm field.  We sat and watched the peaceful scene for some time.  Then we spotted it.  Sitting on the far shore of the water was a bald eagle, obviously hoping to intimidate and pick off a weaker bird.  After further observation, we spotted a younger eagle sitting high atop a nearby tree.  It was intently keeping a watchful eye over the adult’s progress and encouraging it on.  What had appeared to be a predator in search of small fish or frogs, also turned out to be the potential prey — a hopeful meal for some hungry eagles.  Such is the drama of nature.

“The art of simplicity is a puzzle of complexity.”  ~Douglas Horton